Top 4 Summer Reads for Educators

 

Well friends, summer is just around the corner. If you’re like me, you’ll promise yourself that you won’t do any school-related work for the entire month of June. And if you’re like me by the middle of June you’ll be working…or at least reading some education-related books. If you’re in the market for a good read (or reads) this summer, keep scrolling to find my Top 4 Summer Reads for Educators.

Summer Reads

Better Conversations by Jim Knight

So this book is based in education and how “our schools are only as good as the conversations within them” (p. 4).   But if you’re a human who talks with other humans, this is an excellent read. I can’t even begin to count the number of post-its I have marking up the pages of this one! Jim Knight teaches how to talk and listen and communicate in ways that are productive and help promote student achievement. This one would make an excellent book study book for those of you charged with leading one this summer!

 

No More Independent Reading Without Support by Debbie Miller and Barbara Moss

At just 96 pages, this book is practically an afternoon read! This book renforces the importance of and research behind independent reading with student-teacher conferring. After reading this book, there is no way that you will not implement more independent reading time in your classroom! This is also a great read to share with friends who don’t see the value/haven’t been ready to try out independent reading with conferring in their own classrooms.

 

High-Impact Instruction by Jim Knight

This is a big, thick, kind of old book. BUT it’s loaded (and I mean loaded) with research on instructional practices that are super user-friendly. I found myself reading a chapter and trying things out with students the very next day. Each chapter is mapped out at the beginning and shown how it relates to the other chapters in the book.

 

The Reading Strategies Book by Jennifer Serravallo

Anyone who loves goal-setting with students and anchor charts will LOVE this book. Jennifer Serravallo maps out different reading strategies based on different reading goals. Everything from print work to nonfiction comprehension is mapped out in this book. What I love most about this book is that it’s not a cover-to-cover read; I can find what I need to meet a student’s goal, read that section, and put the book down. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve read this one cover-to-cover (several times) but now I use it as a super awesome reference for student goal-setting and strategizing.